5 responses

  1. Lord_Byron
    December 1, 2013

    Could this move against the EU charter of human rights revoke the EU membership of Croatia?

  2. TampaZeke
    December 1, 2013

    That question SUCKS! I would answer that question with a “yes”. It’s equivalent to asking, “Do you support white people being allowed to eat at diners?” Well, yes, but I don’t support white people being the ONLY people allowed to eat at diners.

  3. Atriokke
    December 1, 2013

    I would answer yes to that questions also. I would also answer yes to a question that says if marriage is matrimony between a man a man. I guess the door is open for interpretation on this one.

  4. Jean-Michel
    December 2, 2013

    Could this move against the EU charter of human rights revoke the EU membership of Croatia?

    If so, they’d have to do a fair amount of additional housecleaning—five other EU members have constitutional bans on equal marriage, including Poland and Hungary. The European Court of Human Rights ruled in 2010 (Schalk and Kopf v. Austria) that no guaranteed right to same-sex marriage in either the European Convention on Human Rights or the EU Charter of Fundamental Rights, but left the door open for a future reinterpretation based on a “convergence of standards,” in effect saying that equal marriage may eventually be recognized as a fundamental right if enough member states do so first.

  5. Nathaniel
    December 2, 2013

    Is this a constitutional amendment, or is it something less binding? How is the newly elected law actually worded? As you say, Timothy, it isn’t surprising to hear that an eastern European country made such a move (though it is a bit surprising that it was the Catholic, and not Eastern Orthodox Church, that was the lead in this case), but this is a little scant in information that would be helpful in understanding and interpreting this news.

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