Sunday Driver: “Cuba Needs More Hookers”

Jim Burroway

December 6th, 2009

To get to the Four Corners region of the American Southwest, you get off the plane at Albuquerque and take US 550 toward the northwest. But you best be sure to stock up on refreshments, gas and restroom breaks before you leave the northern suburb of Bernalillo, because that’s just about the last chance you’ll get to stop until you reach the small village of Cuba, NM (pop. 590). There, you’ll have a few places to stop and eat: McDonalds, a Subway, El Bruno’s for Mexican food, and the venerable Cuban Cafe, among a few other choices. Last time through there a few months ago, I stopped for a restroom break at the combination McDonalds/Chevron station and found this scrawled in large letters on the stall door:

Cuba needs more hookersCuba’s pretty small. I suppose that Cuba could probably use more of a lot of things. But for such a small town, it struck me as being relatively self-sufficient. I guess that’s out of necessity — the nearest other town of any size at all is a ninety minute drive away.

2004-09-14 001 (Cuba)My immediate needs resolved (the restroom break, not hookers), I decided to head over to the Cuban Cafe for lunch (split pea soup, a grilled cheese sandwich and a Coke). As I ate, I read a copy of The Cuba News (published monthly) to get a lay of the land. There was a great article about the very early days of the town’s founding as a mission outpost, another “news” article that appeared to be compiled by someone scratching down disjointed notes while watching Glenn Beck on Fox News, a rant against the local police department for their vigorous enforcement of traffic laws (Cuba is a notorious speed trap), and the usual assortment of announcements for pot luck dinners, revivals, and other community events.

But as I was reading the paper and thought that I had gotten an idea of what the local landscape was like, I came across another listing that reminded me that no place could be nailed down to just a few simple images, not even a place as small as Cuba. There in the Religion announcements, amidst the Catholics, the Baptists, the Presbyterians and Assemblies of God, there were two — two! — separate announcements for Bahá’i meetings taking place around Cuba.

The Bahá’i faith, if you don’t know, was founded in nineteenth century Persia and emphasizes three principles: the unity of God, the unity of religion, and the spiritual humanity of all people around the world.  Their main focus is in peace around the world, and they believe that all religions in some form or another embody the wonderment of the one God that unites us all. Those are some pretty high-minded (one might say liberal) concepts. (Update: They may be “liberal” but not so much where homosexuality is concerned. But they are decidedly unconventional nonetheless.) There are an estimated six million Bahá’is around the world, and out of the 590 people living in Cuba, there are enough Bahá’is to support not just one, but two different meetings of the faithful for worship and meditation.IMG_0054Well that reminded me of a very important lesson, one that I should have known well from my own background, but that we all have a tendency to forget no matter where we come from. Wherever you go, you hold the responsibility to see exactly what is in front of you and not your preconceived expectations of what you expect to find. Any place — even an isolated town of six hundred souls — is more complex than any snapshot or isolated image can muster.

My great-grandmother used to defend her rural Kentucky background by saying that hicks are just people who don’t know anything about the rest of the world, and that you can find hicks in some mighty fancy places. With her definition, I’ve run across a lot of hicks in San Francisco, Los Angeles, Washington, Dallas, Boston, London — just about everywhere you can imagine, I’ve met people who thought they knew everything there was to know about middle America. I expected to find hicks in Cuba according to the more conventional meaning of the word, but it turned out that I was the one my great-grandmother would brand the hick. I can’t say whether Cuba really needs more hookers or not, but the world could probably stand a few more trips to Cuba.

Emily K

December 6th, 2009

Baha’i might be “liberal” for the most part regarding their main tennants, but they are extremely conservative regarding homosexuality. They have a history of trying to cure it.

Jim Burroway

December 6th, 2009

Emily, thanks for the tip. I’ve updated the post accordingly.

Richard W. Fitch

December 6th, 2009

Great to see another edition of “Sunday Driver”. Each time helps remind me that we are all a part of the fabric of life.

Phil

December 6th, 2009

Jim, your great-grandmother hit the nail right on the head! I’ve known hicks, many with college degrees, who go to high-paying jobs, live in fancy houses in big cosmopolitan cities, but couldn’t tell you who is the governor of their state!

All they concern themselves are things that affect their lives – which bars are “in,” what’s fashionable to wear or decorate one’s home with, mostly status symbols. I guess what it all comes down to is a lack of curiosity and/or a case of being extremely self-centered.

Arvin

December 6th, 2009

As an Iranian-American (or American-Iranian, just in case the precedence of either ethnicity or nationality does not advance prejudice) who lived in Iran half of his life and inevitably rubbed against a number of Bahais–especially here in the US–I can tell you from my own humble experience that the majority of Bahais that I have come in contact with adhere mainly to the mystical nature of the Bahaism rather than the strict literal theological decree one usually “read” off of the official manuscripts.

That being said, Bahais do tend to have a noticeable tie to their faith, and they do indeed assist each other in a confide of their religious community — think of it as Jews who support Jews or marrying mainly among their own faith.

As far as homosexuality, I believe they are more acceptable than other monolithic religions but personally haven’t probed enough to give you a definitive answer in this regard. I remember being invited to my parent’s friend’s daughter’s wedding who had decided to conduct their religious ceremony in Bahai customs. The most striking feature was the way they went on about their vows and culmination that led the spiritual assembly to declare them as a couple. They were simply asked:

“Do you take this man as you husband?… Do you take this woman as your wife?…”

And bam, That was it. No embellishment, no dragged out litany of mindless gabber; just a simple “yes” and we were off to the partying. Sweet and lucid.

Joe_in_PHX

December 7th, 2009

I have been to (or through) Cuba, NM at least a dozen times. It definitely does have a certain something that’s hard to put your finger on. It’s not one of those quirky, progressive revamped old mining towns like Jerome or Bisbee. But it doesn’t feel like one of those dismal little dying cowtowns either (for example, Bowie, AZ).

Karen Bacquet

December 7th, 2009

Just because there are two communities of Baha’is doesn’t mean that there are a lot of them. Baha’i create a separate community within each civic entity — Baha’is within a city limits will make up a different administrative entity than those outside. A Local Spiritual Assembly is elected when the number of people Baha’is reaches nine, and a Baha’i group can be formed with only two Baha’is. My guess is that Cuba has two Baha’i couples in the area — one living in the city limits, one in the county (or judicial district)outside those limits.

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