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Happy Thanksgiving

Timothy Kincaid

November 24th, 2010

Comments

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Emily K
November 25th, 2010 | LINK

wow. i guess if you’re gonna post a thanksgiving graphic you gotta post the most homo-erotic (yet somehow “traditional”) one you can find.

Priya Lynn
November 25th, 2010 | LINK

I’ve got to hand it to you Emily, I looked at that picture several times before you commented and it never once occurred to me that anyone would think it was erotic.

Regan DuCasse
November 25th, 2010 | LINK

Leyendecker ROCKS!

Dan
November 27th, 2010 | LINK

Why does the card show 1628? That year, a party of separatist Puritans settled in Naumkeag, later called Salem. The venture was supported by the New England Company. In return, the colonists were indentured to the company.

In 1630, more Puritan settlers arrived under the auspices of the Massachusetts Bay Company, which succeeded the New England Company. The Puritans sought religious freedom. They banished religious dissenters from the colony.

Timothy Kincaid
November 27th, 2010 | LINK

In 1928 this was the front cover of the Saturday Evening Post, probably the most-read magazine of the time.

Joseph Leyendecker, along with Norman Rockwell, was one of their principal illustrators and is responsible for cementing the image of Santa Clause we have today along with creating the New Years Baby. His contribution to American holiday imagery is not insignificant and this illustration may even have contributed to the association of Thanksgiving and football.

This illustration was meant, of course, to compare 1928’s Thanksgiving meaning with that of 300 years prior. And that is likely the point that most readers recognized.

But it amuses me that smack dab on the cover of America’s most prominent magazine, one acceptable on any middle class coffee table on Thanksgiving 1928, was blatant homoeroticism, unrecognized at the time other than by those looking for it.

And, besides, I like Leyendecker’s art.

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